Indigo Girls

2017-2018 Spotlight Events

Stranahan Theater

June 1, 2018

Concert Time: 8:00 pm

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Sara Jobin, conductor

Three decades after releasing their first album and countless U.S. and international tours later, the Indigo Girls Amy Ray and Emily Saliers continue to make waves on the music scene. They remain the only duo with top 40 titles on the Billboard 200 each decade since the 1980s. In this concert, experience a seamless fusion of folk and symphonic music as the Indigo Girls perform their greatest hits including “Closer to Fine”, “Power of Two”, and “Galileo”.

 

Amy Ray and Emily Saliers are Indigo Girls. Rolling Stone describes them as the “ideal duet partners. Their voices soar and swoop as one, alternately raucous and soothing. When they sing together, they radiate a sense of shared purpose that adds muscle to their lanky, deeply felt folk-tinged pop songs”. Together they write, arrange, record and perform music which over the course of twenty five years has become a vital part of the lives of their legion of devoted fans around the world, informing and rewarding them day to day.

With twelve original studio albums, three live records, various Greatest Hits compilations, a Rarities and a Christmas record to their credit, the iconic duo continues to challenge itself creatively, over and over again, adding to a body of work that contains such contemporary classic songs as Galileo, Shame on You, Closer To Fine, Kid Fears, Love of Our Lives, Making Promises, Get out the Map, Moment of Forgiveness, Least Complicated and Go. After numerous Grammy nominations and awards and gold and platinum certifications and decades of touring in clubs, arenas and everything in between, Indigo Girls remain active and relevant, always viewing their music as a fresh opportunity for exploration and discovery. “We really work hard to not lean on any tried and true path in making our albums,” says Ray. “So when it comes to writing new songs and working and performing with different musicians, every record and every tour feels like a completely different adventure for us.

Amy and Emily first met as fifth and sixth-graders in Decatur, Georgia and began singing together during high school. Originally billed as Saliers & Ray, the pair adopted the name Indigo Girls during their undergraduate days at Atlanta’s Emory University. The Indigos were attending classes by day and performing as an acoustic duo in local clubs by night when they made their first stab at recording in 1985 with the single Crazy Game / Everybody’s Waiting (for Someone To Come Home) which they issued on their own label, followed by an EP and in 1987, their first full length LP, Strange Fire, produced by John Keane.

In 1988, the big-time beckoned Indigo Girls. Signed to Epic Records and EMI Music, they recorded Indigo Girls with producer Scott Litt at Ocean Way Studios in L.A. With Amy and Emily on vocals and acoustic guitars, Indigo Girls featured contributions from REM, Hothouse Flowers and Luka Bloom. The record was released in 1989 (the Boston Globe stated “The Indigo Girls have simply made the best debut album so far this year”) and the Indigo Girls began criss-crossing the country on tour (a process that has continued without pause throughout their career) headlining or supporting the likes of REM, Neil Young and the Violent Femmes.

Decades into their career, the Indigo Girls still amaze conventional pundits with their ability to grow and thrive no matter what the state of the music industry is at any given point. The duo’s constant touring, as well as staunch dedication to a number of social and environmental causes, has earned them a fervidly devoted following over the years. So many artists who launched their careers in the late 1980s have slipped from our collective memory. In contrast, the Indigo Girls stand tall, having earned the lasting respect and devotion of a multi-generational audience which continues to experience their creative evolution in the studio and on stage. The adventure may take the form of an adrenaline-fueled live CD or a warm reflective holiday album or a collection of songs that can veer from the raucous to intimate in the blink of an eye. No matter where their creative journey takes them, they hold out a hand to their listeners and we get to feel it all.

 

Grammy-nominated conductor Sara Jobin has a passion for opera, new and American repertoire, and sacred music.

She is Chief Conductor of the Center for Contemporary Opera in New York, and Resident Conductor of the Toledo Symphony and Associate Conductor of the Toledo Opera,

In 2004, she had the honor of making history as the first woman to conduct mainstage subscription performances at San Francisco Opera, conducting Tosca with Carol Vaness and Der fliegende Holländer with Nina Stemme. Jobin has returned to that podium for 16 performances of five different productions since then, including Philip Glass' “Appomattox” and the world premiere production of “The Secret Garden.”

Jobin has guest conducted the opera companies in Arizona, Baltimore (where she was again the first woman), Pittsburgh, Santa Barbara, Anchorage, Tacoma, and Idaho. She has also conducted the Dayton Philharmonic, Symphony Silicon Valley, Orchestra of St. Luke's, and the Bochumer Philharmoniker.  Internationally, she has also led American operas in Szeged, Hungary, and Avignon, France, and brought one in workshop form to Shanghai.

Her first full-length recording, the comedy “Volpone” by John Musto, was nominated for a 2010 Grammy for Best Opera Recording. Her discography also includes a Brubeck premiere with beloved mezzo Frederica von Stade.

As a freelancer, Jobin particularly seeks out projects that increase cross-cultural or interfaith understanding.  Recently she led a performance of the Bach B minor Mass at Dachau in memory of Noorunisa Inayat Khan, a Sufi Muslim who gave her life as a British spy in WW II.  She premiered Mohican composer Brent Michael David’s “The Purchase of Manhattan,” told from the Native American perspective, at the Marble Collegiate Church in New York, and portions of Shelia Silver’s “A Thousand Splendid Suns,” a work still in progress, at the Opera America New Works Forum.

Named a Leonard Bernstein Music Scholar by Harvard College, Jobin tends to defy traditional categories. She earned her black belt in judo on the same day as conducting “Beethoven's Fifth” for the first time. She sang for many years in the Glide Ensemble, a gospel choir featured in the movie “The Pursuit of Happiness” with Will Smith; prefers to ride a bicycle for transportation year round; and is looking for more opportunities to conduct sacred music. Tired of operas where the women die victimized by society, Jobin founded the Different Voice Opera Project in collaboration with Carol Gilligan.

Jobin comes from a multi-colored, multi-faith family with a strong tradition of social justice activism.  She pledges her talent to increase the peace.

 

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